Media Violence

Violence in the media is pervasive. The destructive effects of violent music videos, video games, TV programs, music lyrics, Internet, and television programs are being absorbed daily by our children and youth.  They are directly linked to safety in schools and in our communities. Our society can't afford to be complacent against the invasive power of the media to influence young people.

Critical Media Literacy Resource

The Centre has partnered with the Ontario Public School Board Association  and the Violence in the Media Coalition to raise awareness, promote education and action in Ontario schools by developing user friendly educational materials at several levels.

This resource includes:

  • Teacher–friendly lesson plans for elementary and secondary students that are clearly connected to existing curriculum expectations to ensure that this initiative is not seen as additional workload but rather an opportunity for integrative studies on the impact of media violence at different grade levels.
  • Material available for teachers and parent groups for public forums on media violence including PowerPoint presentations, overheads, brochures and information packages on media violence that can be downloaded from the OPSBA web-site as well as partner organizations' web-sites. The material will include current research on media violence, classroom and group activities connected to the curriculum, agendas for a parent information night/ workshop, readings, and links to other resources and helpful web- sites. 

Learn More: Critical Media Literacy Resources for JK-Grade 12: Addressing Violence in the Media

Critical Media Literacy Resources for JK-Grade 12: Addressing Violence in the Media - See more at: http://www.learningtoendabuse.ca/critical-media-literacy-resources-jk-gr...

When Violence Becomes Entertaining: Recapturing Childhood and Adolescence from the Toxic Influence of Media. 

October 20-21, 2011
Faculty of Education, Western University, London, Ontario.

In collaboration with several partners, more than 500 people attended the conference for educators and students to learn more about media violence.  The conference opened with a forum featuring Georges Laraque, Dr. Charles Tator and Ron Wicks discussing violence in sports. Also featured was a forum theatre presentation "Tuned Out" by members of the Thames Valley District School Board. Resources from this conference are available in the following links: 

  • Program Flyer
  • Resources – notes and slides of presentations from the conference on topics including positive use of technology; media violence resources for students; positive uses of technology in the classroom; and what parents can do.

Fourth R Parent Webinar Series

A series of webinars presented by researchers from the CAMH Centre for Prevention Science which define media violence, examine cyberbullying and electronic safety, and safety using social media.  Learn more: https://youthrelationships.org/parent-webinars